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Chronic Kidney Stress and Disease: Lower Back Pain, Low eGFR, Low Flow. Coffee and red Wine.

This article is not medical advice. Before starting on any health related regimen, seek the advice of your Primary Care Physician or an M.D.


There was an excellent article in the Townsend Newsletter on Chronic Kidney Disease, and how some simple supplements have shown significant benefit[1]:

  1. Baking Soda (after two meals a day, .125 to .25 teaspoons)

  2. Niacinamide 250-500mg 2x/day

  3. Calcium Carbonate (unless you have clostridia issues)

  4. Along with a diet lower in potassium (potatoes, bananas, beans) and phosphorous (beans, oats, cheese, carbonated beverages).


The results they cited were impressive, and i can say certain clients have shown strong benefits as well.


Many things can stress the kidneys, heavy metals, infections, detoxification programs, and our good friend mold (mycotoxins) can cause significant kidney damage.


However, low levels of nitric oxide [2], can also cause kidney stress and damage. What helps eNOS (NOS3) and nitric oxide levels ? Well for one thing caffeine inhibits eNOS and thus nitric oxide, so drop it like a bad habit if you can (even for a few weeks) [3].


What helps eNOS (NOS3) ?


Hawthorne

Pomegranate (but also raises TNFA - so watch this)

Citrulline / Arginine

Danshen (extremely potent)

Resveratrol


Sirtuin 1 and Sirtuin 3 also support NOS3 (eNOS), and Resveratrol is the king for Suirtuin genes; high doses.


Ben Lynch, calls NOS3 the 'heart attack gene' is his book, Dirty Genes, its responsible for endothelial and capillary vasodilation - especially in the heart and lungs. And now we know why, "red wine" (resveratrol) is good for our hearts:)


References:

  1. Reversing Chronic Kidney Disease with Niacin and Sodium Bicarbonate. By McConnell, et. al. Townsend Newsletter, Issue 467.

  2. Nitric oxide deficiency in chronic kidney disease. By Chris Baylis. American Journal Of Physiology. Renal Physiology. 01 JAN 2008. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajprenal.00424.2007.

  3. Caffeine decreases exhaled nitric oxide. By C Bruce et. al. Thorax, Volume 57.

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